‘The potential application is huge’

Minnesota is watching as the Rice Creek Watershed District tests a new way to remove carp. Designed to improve water quality in Long Lake, the techniques used here could be applied throughout the state where carp migrate to spawn.

Learn more from the Board of Water and Soil Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Crews removing thousands of invasive carp from Lake Minnetonka headwaters 

Friday marked the first day of a multi­week effort to remove common carp from the lakes that drain to Lake Minnetonka. It’s the latest chapter in the state’s mounting battle to halt the growth of invasive species, which destroy water quality and habitat and can have a significant impact on business and recreation.

Learn more from the Star Tribune


 

 

 

 

 

Photos: Common carp are being removed from Minn. lakes by the truckload 

On Stieger Lake in Victoria, Minn. — the headwaters of Lake Minnetonka — four workers in hip waders spent Friday morning tossing nearly 2,000 pounds of common carp from nets to a boat to the back of a pickup truck. The fish have become a nuisance in some lakes because they’re so good at moving around and destroying the habitats of more desirable fish species.

Learn more and listen to a story from MPR News


 

 

 

 

 

Carp removal project kicks off at Lake Minnetonka headwaters 

The carp management plan is based on data from a three-year study by the University of Minnesota’s Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center. The researchers found an unprecedented number of common carp in the Six Mile Creek system, including Lake Minnetonka’s Halsted Bay. They also identified where the carp are spawning and determined their migration patterns. The findings helped shape a management strategy that includes removing adult carp, installing carp barriers, and aerating lakes to ensure the winter survival of bluegill sunfish (which feed on carp eggs).

Learn more from Outdoor News


 

 

 

 

 

Workers removing carp on Steiger Lake to address water, ecosystem quality

On Steiger Lake in Victoria, crews removed four nets, or around 200 eight- to ten-pound carp, with the goal of improving conditions for gamefish and and waterfowl, as well as water quality. It will affect the 14 lakes that drain to Lake Minnetonka.

Learn more from WCCO Radio


 

 

 

 

 

10-Year Plan Begins To Rid Lake Minnetonka Of Carp

If you want better fishing in Lake Minnetonka, there’s one fish that’s not welcome. It’s the common carp. Halsted Bay, in the far southwest corner of Lake Minnetonka, is being devastated by carp. According to research done by the University of Minnesota’s Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center, an estimated 60,000 common carp infest its waters.

Learn more and watch a video from WCCO


 

 

 

 

 

2,000 lbs of invasive carp removed as part of 10-year plan for Lake Minnetonka headwaters

Friday marked the beginning of the first round of carp removals in the area, starting with Steiger Lake, according to officials with the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. Common carp can damage the lakes by uprooting plants, which stirs up the lake bottoms leading to algae blooms.

Learn more and watch a video from Fox9


 

 

 

 

 

Hundreds of carp removed from Stieger Lake in Victoria 

Researchers have identified where carp are spawning and have studied migration. The management plan will include netting carp, installing carp barriers and aerating lakes to help bluegill sunfish, which eat carp eggs. MCWD also will implant radio tags in some carps to monitor their locations.

Learn more from the Chanhassen Villager


 

 

 

 

 

Thousands of Invasive Carp to Be Removed From Lake Minnetonka Headwaters

A years-long effort to remove invasive carp from the headwaters of Lake Minnetonka began Friday, when fisherman pulled up the first nets set on Steiger Lake in Victoria.

Learn more and watch a video from KSTP


 

 

 

 

 

Invasive carp removal process begins

This first round of carp removal kicked off what the group anticipates to be a multi-pronged, ten-year effort to improve water quality and wildlife habitat in the southwestern portion of the Minnehaha Creek watershed.

Read more from the Laker Pioneer


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Carp in Albert Lea being tracked to improve water quality

The Shell Rock River Watershed District (SRRWD) is tracking carp to help control their population and improve water quality. SRRWD is working with the company, Carp Solutions, to tag some of the fish in Fountain and Albert Lea Lakes.

Read more from KTTC.


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Albert Lea Officials Use Carp Trackers to Improve Water Quality

The water quality in Fountain and Albert Lea Lakes has gotten better, but they have a long ways to go. A few carp went under the knife Friday to help get it all back to normal.

“Out here on Fountain Lake, we’re seeing some of the highest amounts of fish biomass we’ve seen in a long time,” said Carp Solutions General Manager Jordan Wein.

Read more from KAAL.


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 Tracking Carp in local lakes

The Shell Rock River Watershed District is teaming up with CARP SOLUTIONS to track all the carp living in their lakes.

Carp is a type of freshwater fish are degrading lake habitat that native fish and wildlife need. CARP SOLUTIONS is tracking where the fish is in Fountain Lake and State Line Lake. They are surgically implanting radio transmitters into the fish.

Read more from KIMT.


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When you mention invasive carp, people nowadays probably think of bighead and silver carp — those flying fish we’re trying to keep out of Minnesota waters.

But the common carp that’s already here is an invasive species, too, and an undesirable one at that. It destroys aquatic plants and stirs up sediment, degrading water quality. Researchers in the north metro area are learning more about these fish as they try to come up with new ways to manage them.

Read more from MPR.


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What lies in the depths of Little Canada’s Gervais Lake? Evidently, at least until the morning of Sept. 23, one rather large koi fish. 

Employees of Carp Solutions were netting common carp in the lake that fateful Friday when one of them caught a glimpse of a shiny, orange and gold koi, a relative of the carp that were being caught.

Read more from Lillie News.